Pages

Thursday, April 5, 2018

spoken word poetry favorites

It's National Poetry month, and in celebration of that, I bring you some of my favorite Spoken Word Poems!

All time fave - Poet Breathe Now by Adam Gottlieb. Part of Louder than a Bomb here in Chicago, here's a great reason to write, and share, poetry.


Touchscreen, by Marshall Davis Jones. While technology is wonderful in many regards, we mustn't forget those personal, face-to-face connections.


Knock Knock, by Daniel Beaty. Just heard this one for the first time today and it's powerful. Family connections and loss. Making the world a better place, and sometimes having to do that on your own.


What Teachers Make - a classic, a favorite since my first years of teaching. I'm sure students would love it too! Discusses what teachers make, and not necessarily money. And if you like Taylor Mali, check out this link for more of his work.


If I Should Have a Daughter, by Sarah Kay. Wishes from a mother, to her future daughter.



Three Ways to Speak English, by Jamila Lyiscott, a "trilingual orator." If you've ever been around someone who says with a negative connotation, "Oh, that's just how *they* speak..." this poem is for you. Code switching, and pride for all the ways we do that.


Complainers, by Rudy Francisco. You're having a bad day? Let's put that in perspective. Thanks Gorz for sharing this one :-)


Somewhere in America, by Brave New Voices. (Explicit language and mature content.) Three girls discuss the ironies of America.


I am not black, you are not white, by Prince Ea. Racism, or labels? Listen and you decide.


Lift Off, by Donovan Livingston. "Our stories are the ladders that make it easier for us to touch the stars." What are students meant to do? Donovan explores that in his address at Harvard's Graduation ceremony.


Trigger Warning, from four girls from Hinsdale Central High School. This poem is a dedication to the shooting in Parkland, Florida, performed in Chicago at the March for our Lives Rally. 


Just a few of my favorites, what about you? Leave me a comment with yours!

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

sol 27: simple reminders

Oh yesterday. Yesterday didn't start off in the way I wanted. As with life, sometimes you have things on your mind, or heart before the students walk through your doors, which lessens your patience for them (by no fault of their own.)

So kids came into homeroom, and my patience already thin, put me in a disagreement with a student, about something petty from that began the day before. We were kinda going back and forth, arguing, when a third student made a comment, "Somebody's in a mood."

And I was stopped. Dead in my tracks.

Here I was all upset about something unrelated to my students, yet they were feeling the weight of my frustration.

So right away, I apologized. "You guys are right. My lack of patience has nothing to do with you. I'm sorry." The two girls looked back, and smiled, and we all felt better.

Fast forward another 3 minutes, and I was feeling my patience begin lacking again, as another student didn't have the proper uniform on. I said something, to which he replied, "You're totally making assumptions!"

"You're right," I told him, and as he began to walk away, I reached for his arm, and asked him to come back. "Ok, I"ll listen better. Go ahead, explain it to me."

And he did. And I listened. As he finished, he began to walk away, and then I asked him to stop again.

"You know, thank you for reminding me to listen better, but now, can I have a turn to talk?" He nodded, and I continued on, about uniforms, about being ready for school, about how as a young adult, I'd expect him to be in charge of that. He nodded, and we were done.

Just reminds me of this, that I had read on facebook the night before:
This is a big part of my classroom management, and so it's important for me to apologize when I screw up. I may be older, but I'm human, and it matters to kids that I set my ego aside and just be honest.

My day could've continued in a very anxious, stressed, and frustrated way. But, because I accepted responsibility for my actions with my students, I was able to make it better for all of us. So thankful I was given these reminders the day before.

Saturday, March 24, 2018

sol #24: not just a moment

A moment.

Today, I marched with 30,000 others in Chicago to make our voices heard for common sense gun reform.

I listened to poetry, I heard speeches, I chanted with those around me, and I carried a sign.


See how a whole bunch of moments are creating a movement, here.

See how kids of privilege use their power to give voice to those who have been silenced.

Let's be this movement.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

sol #22: use your brain

I share a classroom with my coteacher, Andrea. We teach together during block 3, but during blocks 2 and 4 I have coaching periods, and she teaches two general education classes in our room. So sometimes, I find myself in my space in our room, but just working at my desk, not really interacting with her or her other classes.

Today, Andrea was telling her students that she left them comments on their essays in google drive.

Then overheard:

Andrea: Do you guys know how to see the comments on your doc?

Student: Yeah, open the comment and use your brain.

Maybe this slice isn't translating well, but I had to stop working, put my head down, and laugh. Because, actually, to see comments when working on an iPad is not as easy as it is on a MacBook. You see the words highlighted, but to find the comments, CONFUSING!

But just use your brian, kids. That's it.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

sol #20: remnants of a departure

A few weeks ago, we had to say goodbye to one of our students from ELA. The class wrote him notes and we had a nice time together, even on such a sad day.

But still, there are remnants of his departure, namely, our Status of the Class notebook.


Every day we call out to kids to ask them their "status" with independent reading. They tell us what book they are reading, what page they are on, and we record it on a quarterly calendar. (This eventually is filed into portfolios, and is a nice artifact of their independent reading!) Jovanny's calendar is still in our notebook, and my coteacher and I have just been annotating it like this ever since:


We miss you JT!

Monday, March 19, 2018

sol #19: remember when


Remember when we first started teaching together?


Remember when you weren't almost high school kids?


Remember when we first just met?
And you were bummed there were 7th and 8th graders in our class?


Remember how I'm always really proud of you?


Remember how I like taking selfies? (alot?)
So we have lots of memories to scroll through? :-)


Remember how reading is AWESOME?!


Remember how there are 28 teachers, not 2?


And one to never forget: Ohana.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

sol #18: making selections

It's March Madness and I love the brackets! It's only been a few years that I've done them, but they always make these weeks in March so much more fun.

Here are some of the ways I decide on who wins:


1. If ASU makes it, then I make my first bracket and put them through till the end. In the case of this year, Syracuse beat ASU in the first 4 round, so my #ForksUp bracket has Syracuse winning the whole thing. Boo ASU.

2. I immediately eliminate U of A, because ASU :-)

3. Any teams who my exes liked, I eliminate, but depending on their ranking, might give them a round or two.

4. Teams my friends like, I keep them in. Hauer, Duke was for you!

5. Throw in a few upsets.

I'm actually doing pretty well this year! A friend at work organized a pool, and my brackets are in 3rd and 5th place, so that's fun!

Who else is enjoying March Madness?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...